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Press Release Images: Opportunity
02-Feb-2004
Opportunity And Spirit Reach Out
Full Press Release
 
As Far as Opportunity's Eye Can See
As Far as Opportunity's Eye Can See

This expansive view of the martian real estate surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first 360 degree, high-resolution color image taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The airbag marks, or footprints, seen in the soil trace the route by which Opportunity rolled to its final resting spot inside a small crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The exposed rock outcropping is a future target for further examination. This image mosaic consists of 225 individual frames.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Opportunity Stretches Out
Opportunity Stretches Out

This image taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's arm in its extended position. The arm, or instrument deployment device, was deployed on the ninth martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover, now sitting 1 meter (3 feet) away from the lander, can be seen in the foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity Stretches Out (3-D)
Opportunity Stretches Out (3-D)

This is a three-dimensional stereo anaglyph of an image taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, showing the rover's arm in its extended position. The arm, or instrument deployment device, was deployed on the ninth martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover, now sitting 1 meter (3 feet) away from the lander, can be seen in the foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Rat on Mars
Rat on Mars

This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as "rat" (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or "arm." The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Microscope on Mars
Microscope on Mars

This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or "arm." The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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X-ray Machine on Mars
X-ray Machine on Mars

This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or "arm." The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Mössbauer on Mars
Mössbauer on Mars

This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars, by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's Mössbauer spectrometer (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or "arm." The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Lily Pad Spectra
Lily Pad Spectra

The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the "Lily Pad" bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the "Lily Pad" area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Rock Outcrop Spectra
Rock Outcrop Spectra

The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Multihued Mars
Multihued Mars

This image taken at JPL shows the panoramic camera used onboard both Mars Exploration Rovers. The panel to the lower right highlights the multicolored filter wheel that allows the camera to see a rainbow of colors, in addition to infrared bands of light. By seeing Mars in all its colors, scientists can gain insight into the different minerals that constitute its rocks and soil.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Different Strokes
Different Strokes

In these line graphs of laboratory spectra, it is evident that different minerals have different spectra. The graph on the left shows the typical minerals found in igneous rocks, which are rocks related to magma or volcanic activity. The graph on the right shows iron-bearing candidates for further study and comparison to spectra from the Mars Exploration Rover panoramic cameras on Mars.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/U.S. Geological Survey
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