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Press Release Images: Spirit
13-Jan-2004
Go To That Crater And Turn Right: Spirit Gets A Travel Itinerary
Full Press Release
 
Hills Over Yonder
Hills Over Yonder

The arrows in this 360-degree panoramic view of the martian surface identify hills and craters on the martian horizon that scientists can easily find with orbiters Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey. The image was taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
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Map of Hills on the Horizon
Map of Hills on the Horizon

This overhead view maps the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's approximate location in relation to nearby craters and hills. By combining images from both the camera on Mars Global Surveyor and the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover's lander, scientists and engineers can tell how far away the hills are from the rover. This information would be more difficult to obtain from the panoramic images. The hills and hill ranges are marked by yellow lines, and the rover is located where the yellow lines intersect. Black arrows locate the east hill complex, a potential rover destination.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
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In the Far East
In the Far East

In the distance stand the east hills, which are closest to the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in comparison to other hill ranges seen on the martian horizon. The top of the east hills are approximately 2 to 3 kilometers (1 to 2 miles) away from the rover's approximate location. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Virtual Rover Takes its First Turn
Virtual Rover Takes its First Turn

This image shows a screenshot from the software used by engineers to drive the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The software simulates the rover's movements across the martian terrain, helping to plot a safe course for the rover. The virtual 3-D world around the rover is built from images taken by Spirit's stereo navigation cameras. Regions for which the rover has not yet acquired 3-D data are represented in beige. This image depicts the state of the rover before it backed up and turned 45 degrees on Sol 11 (01-13-04).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Belly Dancing on Mars
Belly Dancing on Mars

This image shows a screenshot from the software used by engineers to drive the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The software simulates the rover's movements across the martian terrain, helping to plot a safe course for the rover. The virtual 3-D world around the rover is built from images taken by Spirit's stereo navigation cameras. Regions for which the rover has not yet acquired 3-D data are represented in beige. The red dart to the left shows a target destination for the rover. Red lines indicate the path the rover's wheels will follow to reach the target, and the blue line denotes the path of the rover's "belly button," as engineers like to call it.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Cutting the Cord (Animation)
Cutting the Cord

This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Cutting the Cord (Image)   Browse Image (51 kB)
  Large Image (118 kB)
Cutting the Cord-2 (Animation)
Cutting the Cord-2

This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander pedal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (1.4 MB) | Large Image (5.4 MB)


Cutting the Cord-2 (Image) Browse Image (38 kB)
Large Image (91 kB)
Rover Pre-Turn (Animation)
Rover Pre-Turn

This image shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit before the rover begins a crucial 3-point turn to face in a west direction and roll off the lander.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Rover Pre-Turn (Image) Browse Image (49 kB)
Large Image (103 kB)
Spirit's Travel Plan
Spirit's Travel Plan

This zoomed-in overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's estimated landing site and surrounding area shows the rover's potential "itinerary." Scientists and engineers plan to drive the rover approximately 250 meters (820 feet) from the green point to the rim of a nearby crater measuring 192 meters (630 feet) in diameter. They then plan to drive toward the east hills, the tops of which measure 2-3 kilometers (1-2 miles) away from the rover's estimated landing site. This image is a composite of images taken by the camera on Mars Global Surveyor and the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover's lander.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
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Right on Target
Right on Target

This map shows the estimated location of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit within Gusev Crater, Mars. Engineers targeted Spirit for the center of the blue ellipse. Measurements taken during the rover's descent by the Deep Space Network predicted its landing site to be the spot marked with a black dot. Later measurements taken on the ground by both the Deep Space Network and the orbiter Mars Odyssey narrowed the predicted landing site to a spot marked with a white dot. When initially choosing a landing site for the rover, engineers avoided hazardous terrain outlined here in yellow and red. This map consists of data from Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Arizona State University
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Right on Target-2
Right on Target-2

This map shows a close-up look at the estimated location of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit within Gusev Crater, Mars. Measurements taken during the rover's descent by the Deep Space Network predicted its landing site to be the spot marked with a black dot. Later measurements taken on the ground by both the Deep Space Network and the orbiter Mars Odyssey narrowed the predicted landing site to a spot marked with a white dot. When initially choosing a landing site for the rover, engineers avoided hazardous craters outlined here in yellow and red. This map consists of data from Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Arizona State University
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Right on Target-3
Right on Target-3

This map shows the estimated location of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit within Gusev Crater, Mars. Measurements taken during the rover's descent by the Deep Space Network predicted its landing site to be the spot marked with a black cross. Later measurements taken on the ground by both the Deep Space Network and the orbiter Mars Odyssey narrowed the predicted landing site to a spot marked with a white cross. When initially choosing a landing site for the rover, engineers avoided hazardous craters outlined here in yellow and red. This map consists of data taken during Spirit's descent by the descent image motion estimation system located at the bottom of the rover.
Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Turning in the Testbed
Turning in the Testbed

This image, taken in the JPL In-Situ Instruments Laboratory or "Testbed," shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit after the rover has backed up and turned 45 degrees counterclockwise. Engineers rehearsed this maneuver at JPL before performing it on Mars. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face the rear direction and drive off a rear side lander petal.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Turning on Mars
Turning on Mars

This image, taken on Mars, shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit after the rover has backed up 25 centimeters (10 inches) and turned 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face the rear direction and drive off a rear side lander petal. Note that the view in this image matches that of the image taken during rehearsal of this maneuver in the JPL testbed.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (51 kB) | Large Image (116 kB)

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