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Press Release Images: Spirit
12-Feb-2004
Student Programs Tap Into Mars Rover Adventures
Full Press Release
Strolling on Martian Ground
Strolling on Martian Ground

This animation is created from still images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during its approximately 21.2-meter (69.6-foot) drive across the pebbly ground at Gusev Crater, Mars, on the 37th day, or sol, of its mission (Feb. 9, 2004). Two sols later, Spirit drove another 24 meters (78.7 feet) toward a rock target called White Boat. The images were captured by the rover's front hazard-avoidance camera after it began the autonomous portion of its drive.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (86 kB) | Large (39 kB)
Mind of Its Own
Mind of Its Own

This animation shows the path the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit traveled during its 24-meter (78.7-foot) autonomous drive across the bumpy terrain at Gusev Crater, Mars, on the 39th day, or sol, of its mission. The colored data are from the rover's hazard-avoidance camera and have been reconstructed to show the topography of the land. Red areas indicate extremely hazardous terrain, and green patches denote safe, smooth ground. At the end of its drive, Spirit decided it was safer to back up then go forward. The rover is now positioned directly in front of its target, a rock dubbed Stone Council.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (114 kB) | Large (333 kB)
A Clean Adirondack (3-D)
A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS/Texas A&M
Browse Image (87 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Adirondack Post-Drill (3-D)
Adirondack Post-Drill (3-D)

This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool to drill into the rock. Debris from the use of the tool is visible to the left of the hole.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS/Texas A&M
Browse Image (48 kB) | Large (934 kB)
The Heat Below
The Heat Below

This graph shows that the air 30 meters above the surface of Mars at Gusev Crater, Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's landing site, is hotter and fluctuates in temperature to a larger degree than the air higher up at 500 meters. These data, acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, help scientists understand how the bottom layer of air closest to the surface behaves and interacts with global winds.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (86 kB) | Large (554 kB)
Martian Heat on the Rise
Martian Heat on the Rise

This graph shows that the atmospheric temperatures above the surface of Mars at Gusev Crater, Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's landing site, fluctuate to a significant degree. The color red denotes warmer temperatures, while blue is cooler. The red and yellow waves of color represent thermals, or pockets of heat, which rise and fall across the surface. These data, acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, help scientists understand how the bottom layer of air closest to the surface behaves and interacts with global winds.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (130 kB) | Large (975 kB)

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