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Press Release Images: Spirit
15-Jun-2004
Mars Rovers Going the Extra Mile
Full Press Release
 
'Pot of Gold' and 'Rotten Rocks'
'Pot of Gold' and 'Rotten Rocks'

This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed "Pot of Gold" (upper left), located near the base of the "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater. Scientists are intrigued by this unusual-looking, nodule-covered rock and plan to investigate its detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 159 (June 14, 2004).

To the right is a set of rocks referred to as "Rotten Rocks" for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of these rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's "Eagle Crater." This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (108 kB) | Large (572 kB)
'Pot of Gold'
'Pot of Gold'

This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed "Pot of Gold" (upper left), located near the base of the "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater. The rock's nodules and layered appearance have inspired rover team members to investigate the rock's detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (48 kB) | Large (288 kB)
'Pot of Gold' Close-up
'Pot of Gold' Close-up

This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a close-up of the rock dubbed "Pot of Gold" (upper left), which is located near the base of the "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater. Scientists are intrigued by this unusual-looking, nodule-covered rock and plan to investigate its detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 159 (June 14, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (53 kB) | Large (457 kB)
Dirty Rotten Rocks
Dirty Rotten Rocks

This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a collection of rocks (upper right) at Gusev Crater that have captured the attention of scientists for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of the rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain in tact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's "Eagle Crater." This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (57.5 kB) | Large (310 kB)
'Cobra Hoods' (Animation)
'Cobra Hoods'

This animation flips back and forth between left and right eye images of the odd rock formation dubbed "Cobra Hoods" (center top). The images were taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Rover scientists say this resistant rock is unlike anything they've seen on Mars so far. Spirit will investigate the rock in coming sols. These pictures was captured on sol 156 (June 11, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Large (92.4 MB)
'Cobra Hoods'
'Cobra Hoods'

This image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the odd rock formation dubbed "Cobra Hoods" (center top). Rover scientists say this resistant rock is unlike anything they've seen on Mars so far. Spirit will investigate the rock in coming sols. This picture was captured on sol 156 (June 11, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Large (102 kB)
Slippery Slope?
Slippery Slope?

This digital elevation map shows the topography of the "Columbia Hills," just in front of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Rover planners are currently plotting the safest route for Spirit to climb to the front hill, called "West Spur." The direct path from the bottom crosshatch to the top crosshatch may be too steep. Data from the Mars Orbital Camera on the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor were used to create this 3-D map.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/USGS/MSSS
Browse Image | Medium Image (39 kB) | Large (346 kB)
Which Way to the Top?
Which Way to the Top?

This digital elevation map shows the topography of the "Columbia Hills," just in front of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Colors indicate the slopes of the hills, with red areas being the gentlest and blue the steepest. Rover planners are currently plotting the safest route for Spirit to climb the front hill, called "West Spur." The direct path straight up through the blue area may be too steep. Data from the Mars Orbital Camera on the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor were used to create this 3-D map.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/USGS/MSSS
Browse Image | Medium Image (128 kB) | Large (884 kB)
 
'Columbia Hills' at Last!
'Columbia Hills' at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the images that make up this 360-degree panorama with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the "Columbia Hills." Since landing at Gusev Crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover undertook to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (317 kB) | Large (4.1 MB)
 
The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the images that make up this 360-degree mosaic anaglyph with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image, projected at a cylindrical perspective, highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (433 kB) | Large (5 MB)
 
The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this left eye of a pair of stereo images, projected at a cylindrical perspective, with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (347 kB) | Large (3.3 MB)
 
The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this right eye of a pair of stereo images, projected at a cylindrical perspective, with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (333 kB) | Large (3.2 MB)
Spirit's Trip to the Hills
Spirit's Trip to the Hills

This overhead view of a portion of Gusev Crater shows the route the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has traveled since arriving on the red planet over five months ago. On sol 156 (June 11, 2004), Spirit reached the base of the "Columbia Hills," where it is currently investigating some unusual rocks. The rover may eventually head to the top of one of the closest hills.

This image is a composite of images taken by the camera on the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor and the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover's lander.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
Browse Image | Medium Image (118 kB) | Large (2 MB)
Image for June 15, 2004
Spirit's Travel Plan

This zoomed-in overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's estimated landing site and surrounding area shows the rover's potential "itinerary." Scientists and engineers plan to drive the rover approximately 250 meters (820 feet) from the green point to the rim of a nearby crater measuring 192 meters (630 feet) in diameter. They then plan to drive toward the east hills, the tops of which measure 2-3 kilometers (1-2 miles) away from the rover's estimated landing site. This image is a composite of images taken by the camera on Mars Global Surveyor and the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover's lander.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
Browse Image | Medium Image (109 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)

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