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Press Release Images: Opportunity
06-May-2005
 
 
Dust Devil in Gusev Crater, Sol 445

Image:
This image shows a single dust devil that lofts dust into the air about 2 kilometers (1 mile) away, moving across a plain inside Mars' Gusev Crater.
Browse Image | Medium Image (55 kB) | Large (205 kB)


Movie clip:
This movie clip shows a single dust devil that lofts dust into the air about 2 kilometers (1 mile) away, moving across a plain inside Mars' Gusev Crater for several minutes.
Large Version (6 MB)

This movie clip shows a single dust devil -- a whirlwind that lofts dust into the air -- about 2 kilometers (1 mile) away, moving across a plain inside Mars' Gusev Crater for several minutes. The dust devil appears in 21 frames. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames. The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took these images on the rover's 445th martian day, or sol (April 14, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil.

Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright "hollows", which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
 
Dust Devil Near Spirit, Sol 446

Image:
This image shows a single dust devil that lofts dust into the air that passed near the bottom of the hillside where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was located at the time.
Browse Image | Medium Image (53 kB) | Large (136 kB)


Movie clip:
This movie clip shows a single dust devil that lofts dust into the air that passed near the bottom of the hillside where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was located at the time.
Large Version (6 MB)

This movie clip shows a single dust devil -- a whirlwind that lofts dust into the air -- that passed near the bottom of the hillside where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was located at the time. A shorter clip of the same dust devil was release previously PIA-07861, but an additional frame of the sequence was sent later by the rover. The proximity of the dust devil makes this sequence the best obtained so far for showing details of its structure. Spirit's navigation camera took these images on the rover's 446th martian day, or sol (April 15, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil.

Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright "hollows", which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
 
Several Dust Devils in Gusev Crater, Sol 461

Image:
This image shows a several dust devils that loft dust into the air, moving across a plain below the hillside vantage point of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.
Browse Image | Medium Image (41 kB) | Large (107 kB)


Movie clip:
This movie clip shows a several dust devils that loft dust into the air, moving across a plain below the hillside vantage point of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.
Large Version (6 MB)

This movie clip shows a several dust devils -- whirlwinds that loft dust into the air -- moving across a plain below the hillside vantage point of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Several of the dust devils are visible at once in some of the 21 frames in this sequence. The local solar time was about 2 p.m., when the ground temperature was high enough to cause turbulence that kicks up dust devils as the wind blows across the plain. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames. Spirit's navigation camera took these images on the rover's 461st martian day, or sol (April 20, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil.

Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright "hollows", which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
 
Dust Devils in Gusev Crater, Sol 463

Image:
This image shows a several dust devils that loft dust into the air, moving across a plain below the hillside vantage point of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.
Browse Image | Medium Image (61 kB) | Large (159 kB)


Movie clip:
This movie clip shows a several dust devils that loft dust into the air, moving across a plain below the hillside vantage point of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.
Large Version (5.7 MB)

This movie clip shows a several dust devils -- whirlwinds that loft dust into the air -- moving across a plain below the hillside vantage point of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Several of the dust devils are visible at once in some of the frames in this sequence. The local solar time was about 2 p.m., when the ground temperature was high enough to cause turbulence that kicks up dust devils as the wind blows across the plain. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames. Spirit's navigation camera took these images on the rover's 463rd martian day, or sol (April 22, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil.

Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright "hollows", which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
 
Large Dust Devil on Horizon, Sol 468

Image:
This image shows a large, distant dust devil that lofts dust into the air, as a dark shape on the horizon near the right side of the images.
Browse Image | Medium Image (69 kB) | Large (183 kB)


Movie clip:
This movie clip shows a large, distant dust devil that lofts dust into the air, as a dark shape on the horizon near the right side of the images.
Large Version (6 MB)

This movie clip shows a large, distant dust devil -- a whirlwind that lofts dust into the air -- as a dark shape on the horizon near the right side of the images. This dust devil was about 5 kilometers (3 miles) away from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, and may have been up to 200 meters or yards in diameter. Smaller dust devils closer to the rover appear bright against the dark ground. Spirit's navigation camera took these images on the rover's 468th martian day, or sol (April 27, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames.

Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright "hollows", which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL

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