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Special-Effects Images: Opportunity
06-Oct-2006
 
 
Superimposed Rover on Rim of Victoria Crater
Superimposed Rover on Rim of Victoria Crater

This image superimposes an artist's concept of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the rim of Victoria Crater. It is done to give a sense of scale.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
16-Dec-2005
 
 
This image shows a model of the rover on the right-hand side of the image, tilted in its position on the lower part of a cliff.  The cliff has reddish-brown 'dirt', with a fortress-like layer of rocks at the upper levels.  The sky is butterscotch in color.
Opportunity on 'Burns Cliff' (Simulated)

This synthetic image of NASA's Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover inside Endurance Crater was produced using "Virtual Presence in Space" technology. Developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., this technology combines visualization and image processing tools with Hollywood-style special effects. The image was created using a photorealistic model of the rover and an approximately full-color mosaic. The size of the rover in the image is approximately correct and was based on the size of the rover tracks in the mosaic.

Because this synthesis provides viewers with a sense of their own "virtual presence" (as if they were there themselves), such views can be useful to mission teams by enhancing perspective and a sense of scale.

Opportunity captured the underlying view of "Burns Cliff" after driving right to the base of this southeastern portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." The view combines frames taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera between the rover's 287th and 294th martian days (Nov. 13 to 20, 2004).

This is a composite of 46 different images, each acquired in seven different Pancam filters. It is an approximately true-color rendering generated from the panoramic camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters. The mosaic spans more than 180 degrees side to side. Because of this wide-angle view, the cliff walls appear to bulge out toward the camera. In reality the walls form a gently curving, continuous surface. See PIA07110 .

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell.

Image Note: Rover model by Dan Maas, synthetic image by Zareh Gorjian, Koji Kuramura, Mike Stetson and Eric M. De Jong.

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This image shows a model of a rover wheel on top of whitish slabs of rock, scattered with small bead-like grains that have been identified as the mineral hematite.  To get a  sense of scale, the wheel appears to be about the size of a dinner plate next to the bead-like features, about the size of BBs.
Opportunity Inside 'Endurance Crater' (Simulated)

This synthetic image of NASA's Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover inside Endurance Crater was produced using "Virtual Presence in Space" technology. Developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., this technology combines visualization and image-processing tools with Hollywood-style special effects. The image was created using a photorealistic model of the rover and a false-color mosaic taken on sol 134 (June 9, 2004) by Opportunity's panoramic camera with the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. See PIA06317 . The size of the rover in the image is approximately correct and was based on the size of other features in the image.

Because this synthesis provides viewers with a sense of their own "virtual presence" (as if they were there themselves), such views can be useful to mission teams by enhancing perspective and a sense of scale.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell.

Image Note: Rover model by Dan Maas, synthetic image by Zareh Gorjian, Koji Kuramura, Mike Stetson and Eric M. De Jong.

Browse Image | Medium Image (295 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)

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